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Stata Center: Interior

photo As I wandered the interior of the Stata Center and into the various "tribal" lab areas, I was under the impression that the building was still under construction. This was true: Brooks' robolab and the fourth floor commons were still being built. There was also building materials scattered about, including numerous items made out of plywood, such as benches, tables, and most commonly, cubicle-like dividers (example). It turns out that the plywood was actually the finished product.

When I first found this out, I was in disbelief. I had wandered the building for half an hour thinking that I was just seeing more construction materials, but then hogue pointed out that the plywood was actually a theme for the furniture, a cheap, ugly theme. The Stata Center in many ways represents leading-edge use of materials in construction, and it is simply mind-boggling to me that plywood would play a prominent role in furnishing the building.

That said, the rest of my impressions about the interior of the building were mostly positive. The most compelling design theme was the manner in which Gehry cleverly allowed the exterior of the building to penetrate into the interior; walls that were external fascade often continued into the building, usually with a skylight demarking the separation of spaces. Gehry places windows everywhere, allowing light from the outside to penetrate nearly every part of the building; conference rooms generally had three windows, each allowing sunlight to penetrate.

The combination of the two elements create the an interesting inversion: even interior windows have the appearance of opening to the outside, as what you see out of an interior window is often the same as what you would see out of an exterior window (example).

Other elements of the interior that I liked include the spiral staircases and the 123 lecture hall. I also think that the two-story lab areas will be very interesting work environments, as they offer a more three-dimension workspace.

Other elements of the building design I didn't like were the lack of power outlets near desks in the classrooms (not very laptop friendly), and the extensive use of exposed concrete (not always bad, but in the case of office ceilings, ugly). One of the worst design decisions, in terms of building function, is that the separators between the hallways and the workspaces is incomplete; there are glass dividers separating the two, but it turns out that above head height they didn't put any glass in, so there is actually open air between the two. I have been told that this makes the building very noisy.

Stata Interior (82 photos)

Related: Index of other Stata Center entries

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This page contains a single entry from kwc blog posted on May 17, 2004 10:59 PM.

The previous post was Stata Center: Roof.

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