1010 Feeds Project

I think I am mostly journal. some links. I dont usually talk about personal-personal things in my life, though. mostly boring day to day things,
because i am a prissy ass girly girl that likes to write about my nail polish colors and blood soaked toilet paper causing sewage spills.


Posted by: alejandra at February 12, 2004 01:09 PM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?
kwc

meta's blogger or journaler? post got me thinking more about this site and it's intended audience. I've posted more about this in the extended entry, but I wanted to use the front page to ask this question, which is the reverse of meta's question:

What purpose does this site serve for you (blog/journal)? You don't have to answer in terms of blog/journal, simply state what do you want to see when you visit this site, and what don't you want to see. Be candid, and feel free to use examples. Negative examples are fine, though positive examples would be nice as well.

12 Feb at 11:40AM

I journal on my xanga, journal privately on LJ, mix blogging and journaling on public LJ, and blog on advogato.

I log my research (raw text) but don't blog it (yet) for security and usability reasons.

I generally agree with the distinction that journaling is more personal and introspective, but don't believe that it's bad to try to cluster the two ideas. I don't ask for a dichotomy, I just ask for conceptual clusters that induce positive gain in an information theoretic or probablistic sense.

More formally, I might be tempted to define blogging as the activity of maintaining a publicly linkable, time-ordered serialized stream of hypertext and multimedia. In contrast, a journal may not be publicly accessible and may have a smaller target audience.

Blogging seems used more generally, probably because most people wouldn't think of writing introspective thoughts online, because they don't believe in omphaloskepsis or virtual self-disclosure.

I'd say I'm more of a journaler at the moment, mainly because I don't care to yet rise above the noosphere radar, and perhaps because I started out on more community-oriented sites.


Posted by: Andrew Wu at February 12, 2004 12:52 AM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

I guess I'm both. I'll post the links that I find interesting, and usually make some comment on them, but I'll talk about the events in my life too. It's more rare than common for me to expound on the more introspective matters of my life, although I will do it from time to time.


Posted by: Mike at February 12, 2004 10:26 AM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

i commented on this a bit on your xanga, but as always, i was intentionally vague.. i'll expand a bit because big AWU is a good friend of mine (we grew up on the same street).. all in all, i consider my xanga a journal, but i do not take it that seriously.. i agree that a journal tends to be personal and is generally more introspective.. both a blog and a journal, in essence, should reveal elements of personality -- whether through text, goofy pictures, or links.. just coming from a mostly non-technical perspective, i don't consider myself a blogger because i don't really participate in leaving comments or joining electronic communities.. in my opinion, blogging is done more for a perceived audience.. i know that whatever happens in my life or xanga, i'm pretty much be going on in the same way, writing the same nonsense.. what's important is that what i write is relevant to me, ultimately.. not that that's any different with blogging, but with a journal, my "goal" is to remember distinct moments in my life..

blogging/journaling online is definitely an interesting phenomena.. just because it is online makes you express yourself differently (for me, i don't want admissions committees to see it, but at the same time i don't give a shit.. using ambiguous + funny names is more for comic effect than protection).. believe it or not, my seemingly all-lowercase, too cool/informal style actually does have its own grammar rules..


Posted by: puubs at February 12, 2004 10:04 AM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

For myself (and meta I belive), our sites have also taken on a different role, which is that of a pensieve, to steal from Harry Potter. I use this term in place of 'journal,' because the searchability, indexing, linking, and multimedia offer much more poweful capabilities for offloading brain content and making it quickly re-accessible. moblogs/photologs/audblogs also offer new ways of providing queues for memory.


Posted by: Ken at February 12, 2004 09:32 AM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

Oh, I might as well break out the original definition of 'weblog' for people to read. Language is malleable, but this is what 'weblog' used to mean:

According to Jorn Barger, who coined the term:

"A weblog (sometimes called a blog or a newspage or a filter) is a webpage where a weblogger (sometimes called a blogger, or a pre-surfer) 'logs' all the other webpages she finds interesting.

The format is normally to add the newest entry at the top of the page, so that repeat visitors can catch up by simply reading down the page until they reach a link they saw on their last visit."

Similar to what I mention earlier, though, sites like blogger/blogspot redefined the term, as people associated accounts on those sites with the term 'blog'. If your Web site is kwc.blogspot.com, naturally you are going to refer to it as a blog, even if the content more closely resembles a personal diary.

Nowadays, I would agree with Andrew Wu's definition ([blogging is] the activity of maintaining a publicly linkable, time-ordered serialized stream of hypertext and multimedia... a journal may not be publicly accessible and may have a smaller target audience.).

IMHO, the broadening of the term reflects the power and versatility of the weblog software.


Posted by: Ken at February 12, 2004 09:25 AM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

comedians on the presidential campaign

My favorite was from Letterman:

"On 'Meet the Press,' President Bush said that Iraq could've had 'NU-cu-lar' weapons. Or even worse, 'NU-cle-ar' weapons."

Nucular is a pet peeve of mine. It makes people sound so ignorant and white-trashy. And knowing that he does it on purpose doesn't make me feel any better.


12 Feb at 08:49AM
Kenji HAPPY *secret* BIRTHDAY MR. JON NOVAK!

You make my life twice as much fun!!!



"That must be what? 180%?"
12 Feb at 08:22AM

(where journalism isn't the same thing as journaling,
and media isn't the same thing as the press)

Maybe I should go to bed.


Posted by: John R Chang at February 12, 2004 02:29 AM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

Jay Rosen, a professor of journalism at NYU, has had a lot to say about this. Among others:

"Ten Things Radical about the Weblog Form in Journalism" http://journalism.nyu.edu/pubzone/weblogs/pressthink/2003/10/16/radical_ten.html

"Weblogging is an inconclusive act-- which is different from having no conclusions or firm conclusions." http://journalism.nyu.edu/pubzone/weblogs/pressthink/2003/10/23/doc_inconclusive.html

"reporters... are professionally bound to avoid taking sides" http://journalism.nyu.edu/pubzone/weblogs/pressthink/2003/09/30/falcone_sentence.html


Posted by: John R Chang at February 12, 2004 02:27 AM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

Another from my favorite and reliable news source, the Daily Show's segment on Bush's Tim Russert interview. I see the birth of the most deadly drinking game ever.


12 Feb at 12:39AM

Joel, I'm withholding my personal opinion on the definitions for the time being because I want to hear everyone else's. But I did mention "both" as an option in my original entry.


Posted by: metamanda at February 12, 2004 12:23 AM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

Let me rephrase that: why the obsession to pigeonhole? Does this sound healthy to you?: "Oh, I'm a blogger, so I can't really write about this." Or "I am a journaler, so I must stick to my own introspections."

I respect ~process~. By that I mean, I allow my own blog to take whatever form it happens to take on whatever day. I don't let my writing be cookie-cuttered by definitions: I let my keyboard, my pen, and my camera produce whatever they happen to produce, for better or for worse.


Posted by: Joel at February 11, 2004 11:47 PM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

Why can't we be both?


Posted by: Joel at February 11, 2004 11:43 PM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?
When people are happy and contented, they often take life for granted. It is only when life gets difficult, when they begin to suffer, do they look for an answer to their pain. Action and reaction, this is how the...
11 Feb at 11:40PM

I do both... I journel to my personal blog, but on 1010 I just post links and stuff...


Posted by: pqbon at February 11, 2004 11:17 PM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

Um... I thought I was going to say I was a blogger until I thought about my definitions. I think that "journaling" implies posting things of a more personal nature, while "blogging" implies posts relating to links and commentary related to the links too.

Given those definitions, my blog is really a journal. But "journaling" seems to have a bad rep in the blogging community, so I gravitated to "blogging".


Posted by: Cshell at February 11, 2004 10:29 PM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

Awhile back, I posted that my site was "about 50% weblog, 20% note-taking (e.g. book notes, research paper notes), 10% photolog, and 20% journal."

Since I posted that, I think that my site has become slightly more journal-like, because of four things:
- more of my blog posts go to 1010
- my livejournal friends subscribe to my blog, so i feel bad if i over post links.
- del.icio.us has, in effect, become a blog as I post links there daily, negating the need to post them on my blog usually
- i got injured, and decided to use my blog to post updates on my injury

i'm thinking of splitting my blog to try and move more of the filtery stuff into yet another blog. While I like del.icio.us, it still goes against my intent of having all of my content searchable. It's really, really nice to be able to search your own blog to find the link you're looking for.

BTW: I still try to use the term "blog" to mean entries that link to other sites, though perhaps "filter" is more appropriate now that "blog" effectively means "any content created with blogging software." I use "journal" to mean "diary," a personal recounting of events in one's life (aka my "whoopteedoo" category)


Posted by: Ken at February 11, 2004 08:09 PM on Metamanda's Weblog: blogger or journaler?

Have you ever heard the song "I Feel Pretty"? I don't even know much from the song, just a snippet. But what keeps it in my head is that I keep changing the word "pretty" to "shitty" because that's how I'm feeling.

Skip the rest of this drivel about how being sick sucks. You all know how much it sucks... I just need to get it out of my system. It sucks when you can't sleep because your sinuses are either draining, or if you lie on your side because the draining stops in your ears and hurts so you toss and turn and still can't sleep. I hate it when I can't think properly because I'm sick, although it leads to some rather odd thoughts/ponderances that are kind of amusing. I hate having to breathe through my mouth because my nose doesn't work properly. I hate talking funny because I can't breathe. I hate it when I take a sick day and end up doing more work from home than if I'd been at work (and I'm SOOOO not claiming a sick day). I hate having to carry around a box of tissue with me wherever I go.

I am happy that I got to hang out at home and in between checking mail I watched food network stuff. I usually don't watch that channel a ton, but it was on and I didn't feel like exerting the brain power to find something else. So for Valentine's week there was lots of stuff about chocolate. Mmmm... chocolate... A friend came over to take me to get dinner since I have no food in my house and I told him that watching the chocolate stuff was the food lover's equivalent of porn. He then asked something about a naked man dipped in chocolate (the specifics are a bit fuzzy - I can't think, remember). I said it depended on the man - Brad Pitt dipped in chocolate - good. The big fat guy on the TV at the time - bad. Then I reconsidered that either way it's a waste of good chocolate.

Oh, the only good things about being sick - being so obsessed with how crappy I'm feeling physically that I forgot to obsess about the thing that's making me feel crappy otherwise. Strange thing to be happy about, but take it where you can get it, right? Another good thing - I got a big laugh at myself over dinner. I ordered udon (chicken soup when you're sick is good for you, right???). I giggled a bit over the trouble I was having getting the damned food in my mouth (good thing I didn't wear something I was concerned about staining), but I laughed my ass off when I actually dropped a noodle in my lap. I haven't laughed that hard at anything in a while, and it felt good. Maybe laughter really is... nah... too corny...


11 Feb at 10:56PM
This came up in an email conversation I've been having.  Please comment, even if you usually don't.  Do you consider yourself a "journaler" or a "blogger"?  Or are you in between?  Or do you do both?  (And then do you have a different space for each?)  How do you define "journaler" vs. "blogger"... i.e. how do you define yourself?

This was a longer and more complicated question than I expected.  Don't be put off just because you think your answer needs to be long.  I'd rather get a short answer than none.

11 Feb at 10:03PM

This came up in an email conversation I've been having. Please comment, even if you usually don't. Do you consider yourself a "journaler" or a "blogger"? Or are you in between? Or do you do both? (And then do you have a different space for each?) How do you define "journaler" vs. "blogger"... i.e. how do you define yourself?

This was a longer and more complicated question than I expected. Don't be put off just because you think your answer needs to be long. I'd rather get a short answer than none.


11 Feb at 07:04PM

by Karen Armstrong

Armstrong is a scholar of religion, a former nun, and a ridiculously prolific author. I enjoyed her biography of the Buddha immensely. Here she takes on the history of Islam, its several transformations, and its conflict with the modern west. At less than 200 pages, this book is entirely too short for the entire history of Islam, so sometimes it reads like a bit of a laundry list. But Armstrong is insightful, and out of the laundry list you will still find in her analysis the bits that really matter. Her closing paragraph:

It has never been more important for Western people to acquire a just appreciation and understanding of Islam. The world changed on September 11. ... In the campaign against terror on which the United States has now embarked, accurate intelligence and information are vital. To cultivate a distorted image of Islam, to view it as inherently the enemy of democracy and decent values, and to revert to the bigoted views of the medieval Crusaders would be a catastrophe. Not only will such an approach antagonize the 1.2 billion Muslims with whom we share the world, but it will also violate the disinterested love of truth and the respect for the sacred rights of others that characterize both Islam and Western society at their best.

Strangely, I awoke at 9:11 AM today.


11 Feb at 06:52PM