Results tagged “Davide Rebellin” from spare cycles

Sanchez is Gold

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BeijingOlympics.jpgSpain got a well-earned gold as Samuel Sanchez took the sprint over Davide Rebellin and Fabian Cancellara. Spain played a good set of cards, first sending Carlos Sastre in an early break of 25+ riders that panicked teams like USA. USA was forced to burn Zabriskie and then McCartney early on in order to keep the gap on that break under control. When the peloton came back together, Sastre was then able to form the head of a top-class Spanish train: Sastre, Contador, Sanchez, and Valverde. Or as they now refer to themselves: le Tour, Giro-le Tour, Gold, and Spain.

The attrition was high under the assault of the Spanish Armada and even Contador had to pull the cord early, but it was Luxembourg's Andy Schleck that finally broke the race open. A group of twenty-or-so riders went off the front and Schleck attacked to whittle it down to Rebellin, Sanchez, Kolobnev, and Rogers. With some more digs it then became a select group of Schleck, Rebellin, and Sanchez, which looked like it could be the medal podium for the day.

But that was spoiled by the superhero move of the day, which goes to Fabian Cancellara. Michael Rogers and Alexandr Kolobnev were in a chase group behind, but as the kilometers ticked down -- 7km to go, 6km to go, 5km to go -- it just seemed that they would stay out of reach. With 2km to go the chase camera behind Rogers and Kolobnev suddenly panned back: Fabian Freakin' Cancellara, screaming across the gap! The TT champ's horsepower shot them across the gap to catch the leaders with 1km to go. It made for a tighter sprint and in the end it was Schleck who lost out as Cancellara rocketed to a podium position (sorry Luxembourg).

Leipheimer and Vande Velde were Team USA's best shots at a podium position. They both made the group of twenty that went away at the end, but neither could bridge up to the attack of Schleck. Leipheimer worked hard to bridge back to Vande Velde after being dropped, but the chase group lacked proper motivation with the likes of Alejandro Valverde, Cadel Evans and Paolo Bettini hanging on.

Paris-Nice Stage 7: Contador wins it all

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Davide Rebellin got a lot of help from other teams, but in the end nothing could change the fact that Gerolsteiner was whittled down to four riders and Discovery had Leipheimer, Popovych, Danielson, Paulinho, Devolder, Vaitkus and White to work for Contador.

Devolder and Paulinho were part of an early break until Discovery decided to take full control of the race and start pulling back the break on the early Cat 1 Col de la Porte climb. By the end of the penultimate climb up the Turbie, Discovery had already dropped all of Rebellin's Gerolsteiner teammates, so there was little help with Leipheimer, Danielson, and Popovych drilled it up the final Col d'Eze. Discovery then put it all in the hands of Contador as he attacked and gapped Rebellin by 37 seconds over the top of the Eze.

All of this was similar to Discovery's tactics in stage 6, but Rebellin could not find the help that he had in yesterday's stage to pull back Contador. Rebellin was able to pull it back to within 17 seconds, but by the end Contador was able to get the stage win and 22 seconds over Rebellin.

Paris-Nice Stage 5: Popo all the way

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Popovych got in the early break (13-man break that included Zabriskie) and then attacked with about 40km to go. From there on out, it was Popo to the finish. He was in the virtual yellow jersey for some time on the road, but in the end he could only hold off the charging peloton by 0:14. The chase was difficult enough to only leave 50 riders in the main peloton.

There was no change in the overall as Rebellin and Contador finished with the same time. Discovery clearly has many weapons for putting pressure on Rebellin and they will start tomorrow will Contador 0:06 back and Leipheimer 0:50 back. With 16 riders within a minute of Rebellin, it could be interesting. Stage 6 has plenty of hills, but its a 20km run to the finish from the top of the final Cat 2 climb.

Discovery Channel got a well-earned victory to day with Alberto Contador -- their strongest rider at their Solvang training camp. Discovery did all of the work to chase down the early three-man break of Casar, Moinard and Muravyev and got them within striking distance.

The real fireworks began on the final, short-but-steep climb up to the airport of Mende, aka "montée Laurent Jalabert." The early attacks were contained, but eventually it was Contador, Davide Rebellin (Gerolsteiner), Cadel Evans (Predictor), Tadej Valjavec (Lampre), and Frank Schleck (CSC), with David Lopez Garcia (Caisse) tacking on late. CSC was hoping for a chance at the overall with Schleck, but he was shelled from this group as Contador and Rebellin charged. Rebellin did his best to keep Contador in sight, but the steep grade was better suited for the Spanish rider. At the finish line approached and the grade decreased, Rebellin was able to put in a final charge, but Contador held him off by two seconds at the finish. Cadel Evans finished thirteen seconds back, putting him 0:35 back overall. Leipheimer came in 0:33 back.

Contador thought he would get the yellow jersey at the finish, but Rebellin was able to keep the lead by six seconds. Today's stage was billed as the most decisive for Paris-Nice and seconds are hard to come by in this early season race.