Results tagged “Marseille” from spare cycles

Hunter - FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images

FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images

Robbie Hunter got his first and South Africa's first stage wins -- but wildcard team Barloworld's second -- as this flat stage delivered far more fireworks than the lack of terrain promised.

Vinokourov was a big instigator today. After trying to get in an early break, he was next seen at the front as Astana put in a big move to split the peloton in the crosswinds. The move worked and made Moreau the big casualty on the day. Moreau was first bruised after tangling with a teammate and going down, but the real pain came when he found himself over three minutes off the back. Moreau dropped from 6th to 12th in the overall standings. Vino wasn't done yet -- he tried to take advantage of the lack of sprint organization to launch an attack, but Quick Step was able to reel him in.

The sprint was sparser than expected: on top of the abandons thus far, the split in the peloton put Hushovd and Zabel out of contention. Then a crash on the final S-bend knocked Boonen and Fast Freddie out of contention. Hunter just had to outsprint second-place Fabian Cancellara and Liquigas' Fischer and Pozzato.

Vasseur - DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images

DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images

Cedric Vasseur gave France and Quick Step a victory as he won the sprint finish from a breakaway of five. Vasseur's career TdF stage tally is now two, the previous coming all the way back in 1997. It was a fairly uneventful stage, save for the actions of the breakaway on the final climbs, as the rest of the peloton was content to get some rest as they leave the Alps behind.

Today's stage had breakaway written all over it and there's no name in the Tour more synonymous with breakaway than Jens Voigt. A break of 11 riders, including Voigt, built up early in the stage and stayed together until the last two Cat 3 climbs. Voigt was the first to shake things up, but it was Halgand who really shook things apart. A group of five made it over the last climb together despite a flurry of attacks by Halgand to further whittle things down. With Voigt forced to the front and the riders all marking each other's wheels, Vasseur lead the sprint up the right side and took it to the line.

FD Jeux's Sandy Casar took second despite having been dropped on the final climb and having to claw his way back. Liquigas' Albasini took third, benefiting from having teammate and Lanterne Rouge Kuschynski there to help back when the break was at 11.