Results tagged “Maya Lin” from kwc blog

Book: Maya Lin Boundaries

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A few scattered thoughts, with quotes and a smattering of images in the extended entry to go along with Lin's sculptures/memorials.

Technical vs. emotional issues

This quote pretty much captures how I currently feel about engineering:

p. 3:11

There are always technical problems to be worked out -- getting the water in the Civil Rights Memorial to flow upside down or designing the click mechanism for Eclipsed Time -- but these problems did not pose a real difficulty for me (though my technical consultants might disagree). The challenge, for me, is not technical, but emotional: the attempt to capture the essence of the idea that is so much a part of the original model.

Typeface choice for the Women's Table

The sculpture uses Bembo to mimic the Yale course description book. It also happens to be the same typeface as Envisioning Information, which means that when Tufte is teaching his courses at Yale, his design evokes the process of choosing one's courses. I am reminded of Paul Dourish's Where the Action Is, which shares the same cover design as our MIT Medical pamphlets. My impression, as a former student, is that one must be careful in evoking administrative material in your design.

Art by blueprint

p. 4:44

But is sometimes easy to lose sight of the underlying idea in the making of architecture; it is easy to lose the soul of the work as one focuses on all the smaller aesthetic decisions. Or if one is too strong or relentless in the expression of the underlying idea, that idea can overwhelm the day-to-day functioning of the place; it can force the dweller into a space that is too singular in purpose. The process of making architecture is labored and detail-oriented. The actual process must be thought through thoroughly in advance -- it is a premeditated process, making it difficult to be spontaneous and intuitive. Imagine making a blueprint of a painting and then following it exactly through to its completion. How would it differ from painting the canvas with the guidance of an underlying sketch, yet inventing or seeing it for the first time on the canvas? Architecture requires a close adherence to the drawings and plans you have produced in order to construct the building; changes and alterations must occur during the earlier stanges of design -- in the drawings and models. Although there is room for some maninpulations and alterations ot the design during construction, this is not the time to be changing your mind.