Results tagged “Palo Alto” from kwc blog

They have Air

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MacBook Air

The Palo Alto Apple Store has a Macbook Air demo unit (plus one in the window 'floating' in the air), demonstrating that units are not in huge supply just yet. My verdict is that it is surprisingly sturdy. From the little hinge door that hides the ports to its overall resistance to flexing, it felt like a strong piece of hardware. Even the rubber feet on the bottom are the best I've seen on a laptop -- the quarter-sized non-skid pads look like they won't join the other tiny rubber feet that I occasionally find on the floor.

My only knock was that the multitouch pad didn't seem very integrated with the core apps just yet. You could use it to change the text size in Safari and you could rotate images in Preview, but I didn't really seem the point of the latter -- other than to demo. They didn't seem to work in iPhoto, which is where it might actually be useful.

Mine

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iPhone.mine.jpg

Steve Jobs was on hand to bless the phones as we exited the store. Jobs wouldn't let me take his photo and an Apple store employee informed me that they wanted to, "protect his privacy," which seems odd given that he's Steve Jobs... at the Palo Alto Apple Store... on the day of the iPhone launch. There are better ways to protect his privacy. bp managed to snap a photo with one of the demo iPhones, except those aren't configured to send e-mail. So if you want to see a photo, check out the demo phones at the store ;).

I didn't get there until about 5pm and there were so many phones that I don't know if they sold out or not. One guy attempted to sell an extra phone to those in line at cost, which makes you wonder why he even bought the second phone to begin with. There was also an iPhone dissection that occurred in front of the store, which I may eventually post photos of.

Oh yeah, it's thinner than I thought it would be and Youtube looks better than Youtube. Now I just need to figure out the darn keyboard -- though I may have to wait awhile as this weekend in our move.

Happy Jobs Day!

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ratatouille.jpgI've happily been tracking Ratatouille's high RottenTomatoes score (94%) as well as the nibbles of iPhone propaganda that Apple has been releasing on a daily basis. I'm pretty sure I'll fit Ratatouille into my weekend schedule, but I'm still flipping a coin on the iPhone.

I tempted myself by visiting the Palo Alto Apple Store line -- it's Web 2.0 in a Line. Blogger/podcaster Scoble+son are first in line, the Zooomr folks are streaming video, and the SmugMug folks are brandishing their logos. Apparently Kevin Rose and Leah Culver (of newly revealed Pownce fame) were there to shoot some Diggnation footage. AT&T gave out some nice "I Have iPhone" shirts to those in line.

jobs.iphone.jpgMyself? I'll probably swing by the Apple Store one more time closer to 6pm to see if I'm tempted. If the reports are accurate -- that there are at least 500 units at the store -- then there really isn't much point in waiting in line, unless you really want one of those shirts.

UntiWhen: June 14 4-8pm
Where: Vin, Vino, Wine, 437 S California Ave, Palo Alto, CA

Mick Unti will be driving down from Dry Creek Valley to host a tasting at Vin, Vino, Wine in Palo Alto. I try to stop by Unti on the rare occasion I'm driving 101 past Santa Rosa, so I'm going to try not to pass up the opportunity to taste these wines:

2006 Rose
2005 Barbera
2005 Zinfandel (sneak preview of the best Zin ever from Unti)
2005 Grenache (Mick's favorite Unti wine ever)
2004 Syrah
2004 Petite Sirah

Affordances of a Seven-Foot Egg

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egg

"What are the affordances of an egg?"

gus, coming from his HCI background, asked this question after I couldn't help bringing up the Seven-Foot Art Egg (note: this post won't make any sense unless you read my original Art Egg Post).

It's such a great way to frame the Giant Egg that I can't resist carrying out an analysis. After all, if it is going to be "subject to other thoughts/acts of violence typically inflicted on seven-foot tall egg sculptures," perhaps the psychology of industrial design can shed some light on what fate(s) await Egg II (Egg I died glass-bubbly in a warehouse fire).

A popular discussion of affordances is in Don Norman's book, The Design/Psychology of Everyday Things, which serves as a bible for companies like TiVo attempting to do consumer-oriented product design. As Don Norman defines it, affordance "refers to the perceived and actual properties of the thing, primarily those fundamental properties that determine just how the thing could possibly be used." For example, "plates are for pushing," and "knobs are for turning."

Drawing from Palo Alto Daily News quotes, Don Norman, and my own pompous assertions, here is my list of "The Affordances of a Seven-Foot Egg":

Cracking/breaking

The most common usage of an egg is, of course, cracking it open to access the contents inside. One of the acts of vandalism the PADN noted was teenagers ramming a shopping cart into the Egg, and I personally witnessed a passerby adjust his path through the plaza so that he could deliver a swift kick.

This leads us to the next affordance:

Containing (corollary to cracking/breaking)

Whether it be eggs we eat or the plastic easter eggs with their candy surprises, eggs contain stuff we want. This is a Giant Egg, so one must assume that the affordance of a Seven-Foot Tall Egg is that it contains something really good -- it's big enough to give birth to full-sized Shaq. Symbolically the Egg is supposed to contain Silicon Valley innovation, but the crowd quotes from the PADN were more mundane.

Grace, a registered nurse in San Jose, said "It's very ornate, like a time capsule -- somthing I want to open up and see if there's anything in there. It makes people think."

Another person quoted in the PADN noted the possible technological influence of the Egg on its contents:

"I like the shape, it's pretty cool," Geo said. "I wonder if there is a baby computer inside?"

$10,000 seems like quite a lot to hatch a computer -- I'm hoping for something more grandiose that still harnesses the technological potential, something representing the role of US government and Asian investment in the Silicon Valley, something like... MechaGodzilla.

The 1993 (from Heisei series) Super MechaGodzilla was designed by a joint American- Japanese project under the jurisdiction of the United Nations Godzilla CounterMeasures Center (UNGCC) to defend the world from Godzilla.

Rocking/Tipping/Rolling/Spinning

Admittedly, the role of eggs as food means that we don't too often play with it, but rolling as an affordance of eggs is strong enough to make it into an Easter tradition: Egg Rolls. An egg's oblong shape allows for other variations on rolling, including rocking, tipping, and spinning.

The PADN provides a supporting quote from the resident teenage contingent:

"[the Egg] begs to be rolled down the street" and "rocked from its base."

Even a administrative associate at Stanford Medical Center couldn't help mixing compliments and a test of its defenses:

[The administrative associate] caught sight of the egg after getting off work from Stanford Medical Center. "It's unique. It's very well put together," he said, while trying to rock the egg.

Writing

Norman, in discussing graffiti on British Rail platforms, notes that "Flat, porous, smooth surfaces are for writing on." While the archetypal egg is porous and smooth, it doesn't provide that much flat writing surface. However, a Seven-Foot Tall Egg is a whole new species of egg, and the artist has conveniently coated all the circuit boards with a nice, smooth sealant. The Egg also provides it own cues as to this affordance: the artist has already put various handwritten multilingual phrases across its surface.

Multiple PADN quotees noted this affordance:

Tom, from Los Altos said he'd be surprised if it survives in the plaza for a long time: "It practically says, 'Spray paint me," he said.

An employee of Pizza My Heart, Emilio, thought that it didn't fit in with the environment. "It's gonna become art with all the kids' graffiti," he said.

Approachable

This isn't an affordance of the egg itself -- it's more a lack of affordance by the choice of how it was installed. Many public sculptures are mounted on pseudo-pedestals, a slightly raised bit of concrete that sets it apart from the public walking area around it. These pedestals remove the affordance of walking in the area around the artwork, creating a virtual wall of the look-don't-touch museum experience.

The Art Egg is installed with no demarcations between it and the rest of the plaza, daring you to walk directly past it or approach it. It's there to be bumped into, shoved, rocked, or otherwise used within its affordances. Visit the Egg for a brief amount of time and you'll notice multiple people touching, bumping, shoving, and even kicking it as they walk past.

Hugging

It's slightly above average human height, it's round, and you can walk right up to it. After all it's been through and all the entertainment it provided me (via the PADN), I gave it a hug.

Local news

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I love reading the Palo Alto Daily News. After growing up reading niche papers like the Washington Post that ramble on and on about our federal government, it's comforting to read a paper that focuses on real front-page news, like noisy leafblowers and vandalism in pedestrian tunnels.

My favorite ongoing saga is a $10,000, seven-foot tall egg made out of various computer parts, subtlety symbolizing the role of the Silicon Valley as the birthplace of the computer age (note: actually the second $10,000 egg as the first melted into a pile of glass in a fire -- this, of course, symbolized the dot-com bust). I might be misinterpreting here; they placed the egg in front of Pizza-My-Heart, so it could be representing the innovations that had their genesis over a slice of pizza and a beer.

This area in front of Pizza-My-Heart is a popular hangout for all the Paly kids, and when you stick a $10,000 giant green egg in front of a bunch of high schoolers, you end up with wonderful back-to-back news paragraphs like:

Gabe, a Palo Alto High School junior, was also displeased that the city's money was not direct toward education. "In my (chemistry) class we are using five different textbook editions, and we're supposed to be the rich school," he added.

Other teenagers in the group, who regularly hang out at the plaza, said "Digital DNA" lacks coordination and begs to be rolled down the street, rocked from its base, and subject to other thoughts/acts of violence typically inflicted on seven-foot tall egg sculptures.

Paragraphs like those, along with documentation of typical acts of violence inflicted on seven-foot tall egg sculptures (graffiti, ramming it with shopping carts, etc...), as well as quotes from the artist about how she fears her sculpture won't survive to its official unveiling make the Palo Alto Daily News a refreshing take on the issues confronting my community.