Results tagged “Robogames” from kwc blog

Best Played Loud

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My co-workers fought in the heavyweight division at this weekend's RoboGames. Their robot, Counter Revolution, wields giant, counter-rotating blades made out of tool steel to deliver punishing blows. The blades aren't sharp, but that much tool steel can deliver quite a whack. The damage it was doing to the arena was definitely disconcerting to the organizers.

The design still needs some tweaks -- due to the inherent danger in running the robot, the only 'debugging' they've been able to do is at a filming of Battlebots as well as at RoboGames. What got them this time around were the holes they made in the base plate to lighten the robot. I'm looking forward to the next design iteration. There's too many boring combat robots out there, so I always enjoy a robot that puts even the announcer on edge with the potential for havoc.

You can see more video of them fighting on YouTube. Here's one from Friday where they managed to rip off the top of the other robot (about 2 minutes in):

RoboGames 2008

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RoboGames: robots attacking robots, bigger and better every year, June 12-15, Fort Mason.

Robogames 2007 Videos Part II

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RoboGames.jpgSome more video from Robogames in San Francisco. This time around there's robot hockey, Crab-Fu's awesome steam robots, and an instance of Uncanny Valley

RoboGames.jpgSparks, shrapnel, robots sent flying, and smoke: keep reading if these interest you. I went to Robogames in San Francisco for the closing day and watched robots all the way from 1 pound up to 340 pounds compete. Robots were knocked out of the ring. One robot had all four of its wheel systematically sliced off. Others just battered each other repeatedly. Great fun.

When: Fri-Sun, June 15-17, 2007, Noon - 10pm
Where: Fort Mason, San Francisco
Cost: $20, $15/kids 7-17

RoboGames is the world's largest open robot competition (even the Guinness Book of World Records says so!) We invite the best minds from around the world to compete in over 70 different events. Combat robots, walking humanoids, soccer bots, sumo bots, and even androids that do kung-fu. Some robots are autonomous, some are remote controlled - but they're all cool!

I went to this event back when it was called Robolympics (the 'Olympics' sued them for a name change, not sure how that works). It was a lot of fun and should offer even more robot-grinding action than Maker Faire. To whet your appetite, here's some old entries from Robolympics days:

Robolympics photos

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As promised, photos from the Robolympics. I've posted a couple here, there are more in the extended entry.

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Robolympics

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I made it over to the ROBOlympics for several hours today. It was lots of dorky fun. There were some exciting robots fights, with plenty of sparks and metal flying, much more than I actually expected. I was hoping to capture a photo of sparks flying, but my digital camera couldn't cope with the high-speed action, and I also ran out of batteries.

(I will try to add photos to the descriptions in the entry when I get a chance.)

The coolest robots I thought were the Japanese bipedal robots, which look a lot like Japanime robots (photo). There were the lamest in terms of fighting, as they usually fell over under their own weight, and their punches were more for show than force, but they made up for their lack of fighting ability with style. Imagine one-two foot tall robots fighting it out as in a Japanese anime. There were taunting moves, flexing, 'power-ups,' waves, bows, somersaults, and headstands, and the robots could stand up on their own when they fell (which was pretty frequent). When the fights ended, it was usually a chance for the winning robot would usually do some winning pose/move.

I didn't fully understand how they worked, but each robot had one person with a fairly basic remote control, and it also appeared that there was another person controlling the robot using a laptop. I heard one person quote that they cost $7000 a piece, which sounds right for how much probably goes into those things.

There was also the more traditional battlebots-style contests. The wedge robot contests tended to be more than a bit boring, as it involve one robot driving around with the other on top of it for two minutes, though there were some wedge robots that were capable of flipping the other robot pretty high into the air. There was one robot that I liked, even though it lost, called Cyclone, which was a large spinning disc. When it moved you could see all the dirt/metal dust move away from force of it spinning. Vicious Circle out-manuevered it, though, and managed to dismantle Cyclone with a spinning blade.

The Mike Tyson of the robots had to be The Judge. It took out No Apologies with a single, pnuematic-driven blow. One blow, and No Apologies just sat there with a fist-sized dent in its top.

I also liked the Locust, which is a basically a buzzsaw with wheels. Despite getting thrown up into the lexan glass surrounding the stage, it managed to keep tearing large chunks out of its competitor until it couldn't take anymore.

My only disappointment was not seeing any of the flame-based robots, but there was only so many hours of robot fighting I could watch before I wanted to go home and rest up from last night :).

Robolympics

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I'm such a dork, but I definitely want to stop by the Robolympics tomorrow. Here are the event listings. They have robosoccer, robot combat, robot sumo, robots fighting with fire, and much more.