Results tagged “burrito” from kwc blog

Fun local sites for burritos and more

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WalkScore lets you put in an address and it computes a 'walk score' for that address. More importantly, it tells you what all the good stuff you can walk to nearby is, though apparently "Welter's Fun House" at Apt. 165, 750 North Shoreline Blvd, is my nearest bar -- I should see if Welter is willing to live up to his bogus hack listing.

BurritoPhile hosts some of the most important discussion threads on the Web: which burrito joints serve carnitas with the correct balance of crunchy and moist texture. There's a nice bias towards the Bay Area and Mountain View is very well covered.

Zvents: I'm biased because I know an employee, but I went six years living in or around Mountain View without knowing:

  1. There's a Japanese Buddhist Temple in Mountain View
  2. It hosts an Obon Festival every year

I even go to the Safeway across the street from it twice a week or so.

The festival turned up when I search Zvents so d and I checked it out over the weekend, mainly to catch the Bon Odori dancing. I don't recall spam musubi being served at the Obon festivals in Japan, but it brought back great memories nevertheless -- I was surprised that I remembered one of the dances.

The burrito road

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Burritos are on my mind, so naturally I should take the time to learn where they came from. I had been told by my LA-Mexican sources that the burrito was Californian but, alas, that is wrong (even if you consider California historically Mexican).

The Washington Post sent a reporter to travel the burrito road from San Francisco's Mission District back to its very origins. A burrito-faithful blogger has transcribed portions of this journey so that its lessons will not be lost.

As we followed the historical trail, and got closer and closer to the source, the burritos became smaller and smaller, and our favorite ingredients disappeared one by one. When we finally found what we thought was the original burrito, it was very different from the burritos we knew and loved. The burrito's evolution seemed like a cross-generational version of the children's game of telephone, in which a message is passed through so many people that the message at the end is completely different from the original.

The article stunned me with this realization: designed to be portable food, burritos are Mexican onigiri.

(via SFist)

An absolutely ridiculous piece on The Alameda-Weehawken Burrito Tunnel, which delivers Bay Area burritos to hungry New Yorkers. via Waxy

Burritos speeding through the tunnel fight a constant battle against friction. At the start and end of their journey they hover in a powerful magnetic field, seldom touching the sides of the tunnel. Past the Colorado border, however, the temperature of the surrounding rock exceeds the Curie point of iron and the burritos must slide on their bellies in their nearly frictionless Teflon sleeve, kept from charring by pork fat that slowly seeps out of the burritos as they thaw. By the time the burritos reach Cedar Rapids (traveling well over a mile a second) they are heated through, and anyone who managed to penetrate into the tunnel through the Cleveland access shafts would find them ready to eat.