Results tagged “comics” from kwc blog

APE

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Scott Morse: Tiger! Tiger! Tiger!

m and I went up to San Francisco for APE. Rainy November weather was an odd setting for APE, which was bumped from it's Spring slot by Wondercon. It's only been three months since Comic-Con, so the new timing and weather was a bit of a downer. The big booths were carrying mostly the same stuff as Comic-Con, though I did manage some new finds:

I also purchased some original art from Scott Morse. I commissioned an Obama painting, but after he refused payment (due to it being based on Fairey's print) I took the opportunity to purchase some original art from Tiger! Tiger! Tiger!

Scott Morse: Obama

The Tour de Comic-Con is a go

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comicconsplash_ccilogo.gifSchedule conflicts and sold out tickets had me thinking that I would have to miss Comic-Con this year after five straight years of attendance. I was forced to think what my life might be without the crushing crowds and schwag schwindling. But Team Uni has proven that the Tour de Comic-Con truly is a team event. littlestar, parakkum, and m on site braved the volatile Wednesday parcours to secure a last minute entry for me. Southwest frequent flier vouchers took care of the rest.

I'm a bit out of form and I'll have to ride into form for the event. It took the help of d to help find my sketchbook (sitting on the bookshelf, where you'd naturally expect it). There's only ten pages left so I'll have to be selective tomorrow. I'm also forced to travel without many accessories as Comic-Con does not allow rolling luggage on site and I'll be flying directly to the event. Five years and I'm still a rookie.

Nevertheless, I'll put everything I can into the event because there is so much to be seen, so much to do, so much Comic-Con.

Movie: Iron Man

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ironman.jpgI saw Iron Man last night and enjoyed the movie. All jokes about Robert Downey, Jr. and how he didn't have to act aside, lets think about the boldness of the movie's construction for a second.

Most hero origin movies (Spiderman, Batman Begins) spend the early part of the film having the protagonist become the hero and then you get a bunch of bad-guy-butt kicking to fill the rest. Almost the entire Iron Man movie consists of Tony Stark building the Iron Man suit. The bad guy fights are essentially debugging. I can just see the writer/producer meeting now:

"Fans love superhero origin movies. Let's make the entire movie about Tony Stark building his suit."

"I dunno, can we really fill two hours with him building his suit?"

"I know! We'll have him build two suits!"

Kudos to Robert Downey Jr., who as a result of this writers' decision shares most of his screen time with robotic arms (whose last roles were suicial GM-car-building robots) and a cellphone. Even Gwyneth Paltrow takes her acting cues from the robotic arms, dutifully holding items for Tony Stark while he shouts orders at her.

But really, it works somehow.

Before Iron Man was the Incredible Hulk preview. It's the only movie I can think of where a remake was justified by how bad the previous movie was. Another Marvel property, The Punisher, comes to mind, except that I don't think that anyone expected either version to be good.

2,500 Marvel Comics issues almost online

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logo.marvel.jpgMarvel is doing a great service to its fans by releasing 2500 back issues online so readers can catch up on important origin stories and other character development arc. They won't be releasing current content in the same manner, but they will be adding 20 back issues each week to keep you coming back for more. They seem to have hit a snag, however, as the current Marvel.com Web site reads:

Hey, True Believers, the response to Marvel Digital Comics Unlimited has been so overwhelming, we're just doing a bit of routine maintenance to make sure you have a great experience! We'll be back shortly. Thank you, Marvel.com.

via Mashable

Tour de Comic-Con/Team Uni: Prologue

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Team Uni limped (literally) into the Prologue Preview Night: honeyfields is sporting a fashionable cane and kwc visited the team doctor this week to get his patella taped due to a problematic kneecap. The team scouted the very crowded Comic-Con Convention floor and scouted the offerings in the schwag competition: starter sets and booster packs from Wizards of the Coast appear to have the best $$$:item ratio and Harry Potter Deathly Hallows bags from Scholastic are of good quality.

m came through with passes to the Stardust screening Thursday night; kwc was five minutes too late, even though he showed up five minutes early. m was less lucky in obtaining a CC-exclusive Transformers Ford GT Rodimus for the CRAC (Credit Ruining Accoutremounts Classification), but he plans on going in an early morning break to attempt it once more.

Team rookie bleusky gave Team Uni its first points in the sketch classification, picking up drawings from Stan Sakai, the Flight folks, and Owly. The Stan Sakai sketches are rumored to be more difficult this year as Sakai and Aragones are unhappy with the eBay aftermarket, so it could turn out to be important as the standings shake out.

parakkum rode in the wind and carried hardcovers to protect honeyfields and they focused on heavy CRAC so they wouldn't have to carry it on the longer stages ahead. kwc had a similar strategy and picked up a limited-edition Scott Morse Scrap Mettle, RD8 Mimobot, Isadore Vimobot, Usagi Yojimbo Vol 21, Penny-Arcade Birds Are Weird and Armadeaddon poster, and CC-exclusive pink R2-D2 (R2-KT) (to add to his collection of R2s). kwc has never waited in line at for a CC exclusive before and was exposed to the troubling underbelly of Comic-Con: parents forcing their kids to go around the convention floor with them to pick up exclusives (to game the item/person limit) and schwag.

The early-morning Thursday gameplan for kwc and honeyfields is to pick up Harry Potter bags from Scholastic and possibly head over to Mimobot. kwc will head from there to pick up his Stan-Sakai-commissioned "Usagi Yojimbo on Bike" and to the Wizards booth to start collecting schwag points.

ota rejoins Team Uni today, straight out of a five-day stage race in Vancouver.

Flight 4 Preview and Gagne

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The official Flight 4 Preview is up. I'll probably wait for Comic-Con to buy mine so I can annoyingly scrounge for sketches in it.

In related news, Michel Gagne, Flight contributor and illustrator of twisted things, did the taste visualizations for Ratatouille. Gagne documented the viz from start to finish on his Web site.

Johane Matte (Comic-Con 2006)

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Flight 4 was a getting a bit too big and the school libraries wanted a version of Flight that would be kid appropriate. Killing two birds with one stone, Flight Explorer was born and will feature stories from Johane Matte, among others. In addition to being talented, she may be the nicest person at Comic-Con.

Dave McKean (Comic-Con 2006)

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Dave McKean of MirrorMask, many Neil Gaiman covers, and other fame.

Dave McKean's Web site

Mike Mignola - Hellboy (Comic-Con 2006)

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It took about a dozen trips to Mignola's booth, but finally there was no one in line long enough to get a quick sketch.

APE led me to rediscover my Comic-Con sketchbook, with its many unscanned drawings

APE 2007

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I try to make it to APE every year so I can buy some indie comics from the creators themselves and find stuff that would often fall below the radar at my local comic shop. There are panels -- this year included Art Spiegelman -- but I find that I really only have energy to do those once a year at Comic-Con. This mostly makes APE a shopping experience for me, so without further ado, here's what I shopped for:

Ancient Book of Myth and War

This was the only item I went in intending to buy. It is a themed art book that Pixarians Scott Morse, Lou Romano, Don Shank, and Nate Wragg put together. I had read about it on Scott Morse's blog and figured that at least Morse would be in attendance. It turned out even better than expected as Morse, Shank, and Romano were all on hand to do free sketches (in the case of Morse, a painting) in the inside cover. The result is pretty awesome:

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A great book and what you see above for only $20.

Kitosan Tea . an Eastern Beauty Tea Brewing Instruction Book

I know a fair bit about tea already, but this clever packaging of a tea bag was too good to pass up. Contained within is a single tea bag plus cute illustrations that take you through the proper steps for brewing tea, including how to brew the same leaves up to four times. I don't see how you can order them online, but I'm sure if you e-mail her arrangements could be made (only about $5). Afterworks 2 features the story of Kitosan.

Too Much Coffee Man

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Friends of mine are fans of the book and I couldn't go yet-another APE without buying an issue -- I was lured by the Too Much Coffee Man guitar picks.

Gallery Nucleus/Christopher Appelhans: Last of the Unicorns shirt

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Who knew unicorns could be so big, ugly, and cute? I picked one of these shirts up for d.

Super7 T-Shirt

Super7 had at least 3 t-shirts I wanted. I ended up going with an camo-silhouette of a AT-ST, Star Wars dork that I am (not listed on Web site right now). I almost got the Star Wars spaceship lineup or the Godzilla lineup instead (also not listed on Web site).

Kazu Sketch

left: APE 2007 sketch, right: Comic-Con 2007 Amulet sketch

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Kazu Kibuishi of Flight/Daisy Kutter/Copper fame does amazing sketches. I didn't buy anything this time around as I pretty much own everything, but Kazu was kind enough to do this sketch and also let me read through an Amulet draft -- there were some amazing pages in there (as expected). Amulet is an epic effort for Kazu. Book 1 will come out in Spring 2008 and will weigh in at 200+ pages. If I recall correctly, five whole books are planned, though Scholastic has only committed to two so far.

Bean's Song (Book 1)

This was one of those books that just caught my eye. Artist Travis Hanson was working on inking a print, it caught my eye, and next thing you know I have a book to read. It is an illustrated novel (think Stardust). Book 2 is coming out in a couple weeks, so if I like what I read I'll have even more to read. I was told by a Super-Con organizer that Travis Hanson will be there.

APE this weekend

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I'm hoping to make it to Alternative Press Expo (APE) in SF this weekend, but I may be too busy. Here's some of the Flight folks that will be in attendance (via Flight comics blog) :

Hope Larson (Special Guest; table 123) Derek Kirk Kim (table 124) Lark Pien (table 439) Kazu Kibuishi Amy Kim Ganter Chris Appelhans Vera Brosgol Jen Wang Dylan Meconis Erika Moen …and Graham Annable, Scott Campbell and the rest of the Hickee gang!

All set for the housewarming

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I've managed to put the finishing touches on my computer setup, which just about covers everything I needed to do to get everything in order for the housewarming -- d's got all the other stuff covered. We were running out of wall space, so I was a bit worried as to where I was going to hang my biggest Comic-Con acquisition, an Usagi drawing by Stan Sakai, when I saw this nice big blank space on the side of my computer. A couple minutes later I had the setup you see here:

I'll get a better scan of the drawing (as well as all the other Comic-Con goods) when I have a bit more time.

In the absence of reviews for the other Queen and Country graphic novels, let me first start off giving a positive review to all those that aren't the title of this post. In general, I think Rucka has done a great job of making fun spy series that weaves its way through a variety of modern geopolitical dustups. Declassified Volume 2 is the first that I haven't liked, which was a combination of weak story and sloppy art. Volume 2 follows Tom Wallace's early career with a mission to Hong Kong during the handover back to China. Wallace's character development early in the book doesn't leave much room for the Hong Kong story to follow, I didn't actually feel that it was the same character being followed in both sections, and the political setup for the Hong Kong story was below average. Perhaps Rucka was being spread thin having to do two Queen and Country series in addition to his novels and DC duties -- I don't know, but Volume 3 was handed over to another writer in the Oni stable, Antony Johnston.

book cover Volume 3, the first to be written by a different writer, redeemed the fledgling Declassified spinoff series for me. The Irish Nationalist/SAS storyline with it's accompanying glossary was a welcome return to the immersive storytelling of Queen and Country. It's not without a few story cliches here and there, but overall it was the fun read I'm used to, Chris Mitten's art does a good job capturing the story, and I look forward to reading my copy of Wasteland, which is Johnston and Mitten's latest collaboration.

Tour de Comic-Con: Sunday's Stage

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Sunday is a day to explore the floor, break out the wallet, and fill up the bag. Yes, today is the day that Team Uni goes out in search of a high ranking in the Credit Ruining Accountrements Classification (CRAC).

Before getting started in the CRAC, there was some loose ends with schwag and sketch points to get out of the way. Team Uni started off with a quick stop by the Wizards of the Coast booth to see if they had restocked any Attack on Endor sets. They hadn't, but there were new prizes and Team Uni managed to pick up some Magic starter and booster packs. Then it was off to Scott Morse's booth, where I got a Triplets of Belleville-style sketch of Tom Danielson drawn with sharpie and honeyfield's water brush. The sketch combines a bit of the alien-ness of time-trial cycling gear with impossible Spiderman-like body positioning and the elongated Triplets form. It'll be posted soon with the other sketches I got. I didn't commission a painting this time around as I got one at APE and I wanted to wait until I've had a chance to hang up the ones I have in my new place before I decided what I want next. Morse should have a new book out with Lou Romano and others at APE, which I'm looking forward to.

The wandering gets a bit more difficult-to-remember from there. We won some hats from Viz Media, I got a sketch from Adrian Tomine and Yoshihiro Tatsumi (Push Man), and we got some sketches at the Flight book from the always super-nice and talented Johane Matte as well as Dreamworks storyboardist Phil Craven.

The big purchasing came when honeyfields picked up nearly every book in First Second Books catalog -- and I do mean nearly every (five out of the six spring catalog books and two out of the six fall catalog books, the latter were only available as gifts for buying the spring books). I also picked up a bunch of New X-Men issues for daveextreme, which was fairly easy to do for cheap once the Sunday fire sale began in earnest. It's always fun to see what you can buy on Sunday because some dealer doesn't want to ship stuff back.

Sunday ended earlier than normal as I wanted to get back home at a more reasonable time given the dearth of public transit options on a Sunday from San Jose Airport. m and I took off at 3, tired and happy.

Tour de Comic-Con: Saturday's Stage

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I spent most of the morning killing time until Quick Draw, which is really the highlight of every Saturday for me. More will come on the Quick Draw panel later, but for now I'll say that it was as fun as expected. A bit more repetitive than usual with the types of prompts, but this panel always delivers year after year.

Next up was the Brisco County panel. Due to poorly managed long lines I got into this panel late, but I got to see a lot of the Q&A with Bruce Campbell, Carlton Cuse, John McNamara, and Julius Carrey. There weren't as many entertaining verbal ripostes as the Bruce Campbell one-man Q&A show, but it was full of plenty of fun moments in the semi-reunion. I may actually try to get the DVDs, though $65 ($100 list) is a bit steep to try it out.

After failing to get into the Spiderman 3 session, the day ended with watching the Masquerade on the projection screen in the Sails Pavilion. I don't know who won, but I think our favorite was the Nintendon'ts, which featured humorous interactions between various Nintendo characters, punctuated by the decapitation of Pikachu in a Highlander showdown.

Inbetween this was the usual schwag and sketches, as well as my first big points in the Credit Ruining Accoutremonts Classification (CRAC). I got a doodle from Dave McKean and sketches from Chris Mitten and Ben Templesmith -- the Oni booth is always fun to stop by and dangerous on the pocketbook, as I picked up three more comics: Julius (Antony Johnston), Past Lies (Weir and DeFilippis), and Wasteland (Johnston and Mitten).

Team Uni picked up some of the last available Attack on Endor sets. After winning two in the morning, we went back to the booth in the afternoon to discover that the prize heap had been reduced to worthless figurines. We considered it a job well done, walking away with seven sets by my account, for a total retail value of $140.

The big CRAC points came from buying an Usagi Yojimbo original drawing that has Usagi jumping up into the air. Next year I might commission a drawing from Sakai as it's the same cost, though it's not very important as I'm really happy with what I have. I'll scan and post it in a later entry.

Comic-Con Game Plan Redux

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In addition to tech, you need a plan. I looked over my plan from 2004, and it's still mostly true, so I'll just update with these little revisions here:

Daily Plan #1: Arrive at convention center early, park underneath ($8). Parking at the Convention Center means you can dump the quickly accumulating (and heavy) stack of books and schwag. An alternative is to reserve a hotel adjacent to the convention center about 4 months in advance. Update: it's getting harder and harder to park at the Convention Center. We're actually planning on taking a taxi in. Not as convenient, but saves us from having to implements Plan B if we discover there's no parking. Last year we actually had a hotel nearby, which worked out great as well.

Hotels, taxis: A $20 taxi can get you pretty far in San Diego. You may want to consider this when looking at a $300 hotel versus a $200 hotel.

Comic-Con 2004 Game Plan 2004

Comics and cartoons are educational

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... especially those from WWII: Milton Caniff's How to Spot a Jap

Some quotes:

The Chinese has a smooth face .. the Jap runs to hair. Look at theirprofiles ant teeth. C usually has evenly set choppers -- J has buck teeth ... the Chinese smiles easily -- the Jap usually expects to be shot .. and is very unhappy about the wholething ... especially if he is an officer!

...

If you just slap a Jap's clothing to locate concealed weapons you may lose a prisoner -- and your life ... don't unscrew fountain pens or tinker with any object that could contain acid or an explosive. Watch out for sleeve guns and other comic strip gadgets ... The Japs are experts at such stuff ...

See also: Bugs Bunny Nips the Nips, and Tokio Jokio via BoingBoing

House of M

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A visit to BookBuyers today made me think of this series again... (spoilers ahead)

Link roundup

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My dorky quote for the day

I had two teachers for algorithms class. One spoke as if conversation were a non-returning recursive function

I'm clearing out the Firefox tabs. BoingBoing appears to have beaten me to posting some of these, oh well

Upcoming

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With the exception of Wondercon, I'm pretty sure I'll be going to all of these events. Wondercon is relatively close to Valentine's Day, which the organizers don't seem to consider a scheduling conflict.

Friday, Feburary 3 from 7-9pm: San Francisco in Jello at the Exploratorium (one night only as part of the Reconsidered Materials exhibit)

Monday, February 6 at 7:00 p.m.: Douglas Hofstadter at Stanford

Friday, Feburary 10 to Sunday, February 12: Wondercon at the Moscone Center

Sunday, February 19 at 10:00AM: Tour of California Prologue, San Franscico Individual Time Trial

Tuesday, February 21 at ~noon-3PM: Tour of California Stage 2, Martinez to San Jose

Wednesday, February 22 from 11:00AM-2PM: Tour of California Stage 3, San Jose Individual TIme Trial

Fighting hamsters

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purringtonposterjwz did a scan of the Purrington poster I bought back at APE. Behold it's hilarious glory, then checkout the Fighting Machine Super Variant sketch that Purrington drew for me.

via BoingBoing

Scott Morse paintings

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Update 2: cyclist sketch from Comic-Con 2006
Update: got another painting (Kambei from Seven Samurai) at APE 2005

The two items I'm happiest to have received at Comic-Con are both paintings by Scott Morse. After I got an awesome sketch from him in 2003 I picked a bunch of his stuff and became a fan of his illustration style. I tried to get another sketch in 2004, only to find out that he had stopped doing sketches and was only taking commissions for paintings. I nearly commissioned a sketch, but chickened out at my lack of funds.

This year I was determined to get a painting, no matter what the cost, and luckily, due to the generosity of Team Uni (especially honeyfields) I ended up with two paintings. Morse had some limited edition Little Book of Horror: Frankenstein books that he had done paintings on the inside cover for. After watching me covetously eye the limited edition, honeyfields picked one up for me as a very, very, very early birthday present.

The second painting is goes along with my sketch from 2003. In 2003 I asked for a Kikuchiyo (Toshiro Mifune) sketch from Seven Samurai. I debated getting paintings for all seven samurai, but I decided this was a daunting and prohibitively expensive goal. Instead I went for a Toshiro Mifune Sanjuro painting: gruff, base, improper-yet-honorable samurai. Next year I'll probably go for a Kambei painting (Seven Samurai) and perhaps one of these days a Ran painting so that Morse can spray bloody red all over the canvas.

Morse Frankenstein Morse Yojimbo

The Drawing Board/Zowie/Sketchbook Sessions artists did some great sketches for me and honeyfields. I don't know the proper way to refer to them: they were promoting drawingboard.org, an artist's bulletin board they use, as well as selling Zowie 2, an anthology of "Tiki Terror"-themed stories and art. Sketchbook Sessions is an LA-based subgroup that meets regularly to draw.

It's a little difficult to draw a line between this group and the Flight folks as Guenoden, Matte and Kazu have done work in both Zowie and Flight. Kazu discussed the competitive nature of these anthologies during the Flight panel. They are both mediated by the Web, with some contributors as far away as Singapore, and the artists are able to view each other's work posted online. Individual pages for Flight are posted as they are completed, causing some artists to scrap their existing story idea or redo completed pages in an attempt to one-up each other.

I like how both groups have coupled Web-based community, local community, and community-produced physical product, with each layer serving to improve the others. These aren't Web comics anymore than photos posted to Flickr are Web photos, but whatever label you want to apply to this Web-enabled community process, it produces beautiful and creative works.

Sketches: Rodolphe Guenoden, Keith Holven, Shane Corn/maizekid, Ed Reynolds

Rodolphe Guenoden Keith Holven Shane Corn Ed Reynolds

I picked up a copy of Zowie 2 (compiled by Ed Reynolds) and honeyfields, ln m, and I all picked up some of Rodolphe Guenoden's sketchbooks. Ed Reynold's sketch below is one of two he drew of honeyfields as we sat there and chatted -- mine is the first, the second is captioned, "Why does this guy keep drawing me?" honeyfields showed some of them her own drawings while I eavesdropped and got sketches.

APE 2005

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APE 2005 (Alternative Press Expo) was a good warmup for Comic-Con: < 1/10th the size, ~ 1/10th the cost, ~ 1/10th the time. It's also a good time to give more love to the indies that generally look a lot more lonely during the full-scale Comic-Con.

I picked up a print, a poster, and a t-shirt, and got a sketch from each artist that I purchased something from. My favorite item is a PETA-be-damned "How to Create a Fighting Machine" poster print by Jared Purrington, which is a visual instruction manual for turning a roll of tape, a knife, and a hamster into your own instrument of death (update: jwz did a scan of the cartoon). Purrington's sketch for me can be viewed as a sort-of appendix:

purrington

I also picked up a samurai rabbit shirt ("The Cursed" by Duzty) (no, not Usagi/Sakai). Haven't read the comic, as there is not much posted online yet.

duzty

My last item is a print by Attaboy, which looks like this without the text. This is a quick sketch he did for me, which is appropriately twisted:

attaboy

Gallery Nucleus had a bunch of stuff that I wanted, but did not have the fund$$$ for, so I thought I would buy their stuff online instead. I made the mistake of not getting this "Ninja in the Snow" piece, which is $50 instead of the $20 I could have paid.

The Week in Links

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For the engineer that prefers applied math, there's this guide to cracking Master Locks, which explains some of the math behind how Master Lock chooses combinations as well as some hands-on technique for getting the last number in the combination. You should be able to narrow the number of possible combinations down to 100 for any particular lock. For the "I'm a Ph.D mathematician, applied stuff is for wusses," there is the McNugget number, which (I hope) is keeping some theoretical math major busy somewhere (and safely off the streets).

In the world of architecture, the Torres de Calatrava look pretty cool (gallery 1, gallery 2). Not having seen Calatrava-style skyscrapers before, I wonder what Calatrava's New York City might have looked like, in comparison to the imagined NYC's of Norman Foster, Gaudi, and Spielberg.

There were a bunch of historical links this week. In light of current dollar/yen investment issues, let us harken back to the day of the One Yen bill, facilitated by this nice overlay of Tokyo in 1948 and 1992. For those of you who prefer historical comparisons via sequential art, this tour of Batman logos over the years shows some of the 20th century's best and worst graphic design, but which one did the caped crusader battle under when he made his greatest boner?

Staying in the 1940s, we can look at these World War 2 color photos. They could add even more photos to the collection using this really interesting colorization technique for black and white photos/video that only requires some scribbled color hints (I wonder if the technique would work on these 1910 Paris flood photos).

The almighty water filter

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honeyfields has this PUR water filter on her sink that lets you switch between unfiltered (dirty) water and filtered "PUR" water. If you leave the switch in the normal position you get the unfiltered water pouring out. If you twist the switch, the water gets redirected into this filter and comes out "PUR" out of another spigot.

I got to thinking that if I ever have kids, I would use the filtered faucet to teach them all about morality. When they were really young, I would explain that there's good water and there's bad water, and it takes more work to make good water, but people like good water more and they live longer drinking it; the bad water might taste more interesting, but then you'll end up sick and dying of weird diseases.

When they get a little older and start reading comic books, I'll then use the faucet to explain different models of morality. There's the Lord of the Rings model, where you either flip the switch one way and have good water or flip the switch the other way and have bad water. Then there's the Spiderman model, where you can mix the good water and the bad water by sliding the switch only partway, but the good and bad water come out of separate spigots and don't mix. And finally there's the Wolverine model, where the good and the bad water mix together and come out of one spigot.

When they're even older and are trying to work on their math homework, I'll use it to teach them the difference between discrete and continuous math...

My hypothetical kids will have issues...

Panel: Quick Draw Improv

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This is one of my favorite Comic-Con panels. This year's panel featured Sergio Aragones (Groo), Jeff Smith (Bone), and Scott Shaw (Hanna Barbara master). For those of you not familiar with Quick Draw and/or Sergio, you should know Sergio draws obscenely fast, which will perhaps make some of the prompts and drawings make more sense.

Warning: really large download if you read on.

Movie: Punisher

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Brian's Books hooked me up with a free screening pass, so me, bp, and pqbon all went to go see it. The free pass was good, because I really wasn't planning on paying to go see the movie, but I did want to see it in the hopes of washing the previous Punisher movie from my brain.

This Punisher movie was neither good nor bad, kinda lukewarm mediocre. It didn't really know what it wanted to be. It spent a really long time doing the whole origin story, and then it drifted for a really long time through a series of cheesy campy scenes where the Punisher doesn't really punish anybody (well, he does punish three people, but he wasn't actually seeking them out).

He sits around a bit, meets his dorky neighbors + one hot Rebecca Romijn-Stamos, and tries his best to annoy John Travolta. It didn't help that I think John Travolta is a terrible villain. Everytime I see him in a role like this, the movie automatically feels cheesy. For further reference, watch Broken Arrow. The movie also tried to throw comedy in during this long part, but it was the type of comedy that was of the "look at this funny goofy guy" sort, which I was puzzled to see in a Punisher movie.

The final paragraph is a semi-spoiler, don't read of if you've read enough or don't want more of the movie structure revealed.

Foxtrot + BCS

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Comic-Con: Erik Larsen

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I got to meet Erik Larsen at the Comic-Con. I really liked his Spiderman so I asked him to draw me a sketch. He was a bit hesitant at first, as he was slightly annoyed that I didn't ask for Savage Dragon. He was more understanding when I explained that I hadn't been collecting comics for almost ten years (I had stopped just when Savage Dragon was lifting off). If Larsen weren't so darn consistent in putting out Savage Dragon, maybe it wouldn't be so expensive and time consuming to catch up on the 100+ issues he's done in the meantime :).

Bagley Original Art

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I've decided to make my first foray into the world of comic book original art. Here are two of the three pages I got (I don't have a scan of the third, but it is similar to the bench scene here):
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