Results tagged “food” from kwc blog

Sonya Thomas devours 5+ lbs of chicken wings

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'Black Widow' Sonya Thomas took her second straight victory at the National Buffalo Wing Festival eating contest by devouring 173 wings in 12 minutes = 5.17 lbs of wings. Hotdog champ Joey Chestnut may hold the record with 7.5 lbs, but Thomas' total is nearly 5% of her body weight.

AP: Wisp of a Woman Is a Wiz at Wing Eating

Fun local sites for burritos and more

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WalkScore lets you put in an address and it computes a 'walk score' for that address. More importantly, it tells you what all the good stuff you can walk to nearby is, though apparently "Welter's Fun House" at Apt. 165, 750 North Shoreline Blvd, is my nearest bar -- I should see if Welter is willing to live up to his bogus hack listing.

BurritoPhile hosts some of the most important discussion threads on the Web: which burrito joints serve carnitas with the correct balance of crunchy and moist texture. There's a nice bias towards the Bay Area and Mountain View is very well covered.

Zvents: I'm biased because I know an employee, but I went six years living in or around Mountain View without knowing:

  1. There's a Japanese Buddhist Temple in Mountain View
  2. It hosts an Obon Festival every year

I even go to the Safeway across the street from it twice a week or so.

The festival turned up when I search Zvents so d and I checked it out over the weekend, mainly to catch the Bon Odori dancing. I don't recall spam musubi being served at the Obon festivals in Japan, but it brought back great memories nevertheless -- I was surprised that I remembered one of the dances.

Kobayashi's career coming to a close

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Competitive eating champ Takeru Kobayashi's career is being undone by an arthritic jaw. He will be entering he 4th-of-July Coney Island hotdog eating competition, but his ability to regain the hotdog record from Joey Chestnut seems a much greater challenge now.

Speed-eating king's reign cut short by arthritis of the jaw

Hand-thermometer for grilling

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grilling.guide.doneness.png

Here's a rule of thumb that... uses your thumb. I first learned this from someone who worked in a restaurant and I thought I'd share it now that Men's Health has gone and made a nice graphic of it. I have a fancy tong-thermometer that I still use, but this keeps me from stabbing the steak every 2 minutes impatiently (which lets all the juices run out).

via Lifehacker

The burrito road

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Burritos are on my mind, so naturally I should take the time to learn where they came from. I had been told by my LA-Mexican sources that the burrito was Californian but, alas, that is wrong (even if you consider California historically Mexican).

The Washington Post sent a reporter to travel the burrito road from San Francisco's Mission District back to its very origins. A burrito-faithful blogger has transcribed portions of this journey so that its lessons will not be lost.

As we followed the historical trail, and got closer and closer to the source, the burritos became smaller and smaller, and our favorite ingredients disappeared one by one. When we finally found what we thought was the original burrito, it was very different from the burritos we knew and loved. The burrito's evolution seemed like a cross-generational version of the children's game of telephone, in which a message is passed through so many people that the message at the end is completely different from the original.

The article stunned me with this realization: designed to be portable food, burritos are Mexican onigiri.

(via SFist)

Bacon!

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kmart.bacon.jpg

Hmmm, not even I could bring myself to eat from this package of delicious K-Mart bacon. More over at the Consumerist.

An absolutely ridiculous piece on The Alameda-Weehawken Burrito Tunnel, which delivers Bay Area burritos to hungry New Yorkers. via Waxy

Burritos speeding through the tunnel fight a constant battle against friction. At the start and end of their journey they hover in a powerful magnetic field, seldom touching the sides of the tunnel. Past the Colorado border, however, the temperature of the surrounding rock exceeds the Curie point of iron and the burritos must slide on their bellies in their nearly frictionless Teflon sleeve, kept from charring by pork fat that slowly seeps out of the burritos as they thaw. By the time the burritos reach Cedar Rapids (traveling well over a mile a second) they are heated through, and anyone who managed to penetrate into the tunnel through the Cleveland access shafts would find them ready to eat.

Bacon Math

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Update: honeyfields sends me a link to bacon band-aids

New York Times' London Journal

Should it be slithery or scrunchy, glutinous or grilled? The answer, British scientists say, may be divined by a formula: N = C + {fb(cm) · fb(tc)} + fb(Ts) + fc · ta.

That is the scientific answer to the question: what makes the perfect bacon sandwich?

via Scalzi

And while we're talking about the nytimes and food:

You can take the sugar out of soft drinks and the fat from junk food. But eliminate the pungent odor from what may be the world’s smelliest fruit and brace for a major international controversy.

The durian, a spiky fruit native to Southeast Asia, has been variously described by its detractors as smelling like garbage, moldy cheese or rotting fish. It is banned from many hotels, airlines and the Singapore subway. But durian lovers — and there are many, at least in Asia — are convinced that like fine French cheeses, the worse the smell, the better the taste.

Unti + Zazie = Good

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d and I went up to SF last night for two tasty things: an Unti Vineyards dinner at Zazie's. Zazie's is a popular brunch spot, but for whatever reason they cooked up this wonderful pairing:

First Course

Baby arugula salad w/pomegranate seeds, toasted almonds, chevre, and raspberry champagne vinaigrette
Paired w/ Unti Vineyards 2005 Rose
Notes: This grenache rose was smoother than others I've had, less acidic, which I enjoyed. The salad was a bit too dainty to enjoy all the flavors together.

Second Course

Wild mushroom and black truffle fresh raviolis w/aged parmesan
Paired w/ Unti Vineyards 2003 Grenache (Library selection)
Notes: mmmmm, black truffles raviolis in truffle oil...

Third Course

Duck legs braised with red wine and port, dried plums, and black currants
Paired w/ Unti Vineyards 2004 Sangiovese
Notes: Some people were mixed on this tasting -- one couple thought the Sangiovese too alcohol-y -- but I thought that a strong taste was necessary to stand up to gamey duck.

Fourth Course

Slow braised Niman Ranch beef shanks w/soft mascarpone chive polenta
Paired w/ Unti Vineyards 2003 Syrah 'Benchland' Reserve
Notes: the polenta was creamy like mashed potatoes, which makes me actually like polenta. The Benchland reserve was the wine that my dad and I picked up two bottles of on our way back from Garberville.

Dessert

Guittard chocolate torte w/whipped dark chocolate ganache and creme anglaise
Paired w/ Unti Vineyards 2004 Banyuls Grenache (barrel sample)
*Notes: d notes that the torte was the Platonic Form of a Cadbury cream egg. This is in fact high praise. The Banyuls Grenache was a dry grape grenache batch rescued with water, sugar and brandy. *

I missed out on getting Unti's Barbera Port, which sold out far too quickly, so I enjoyed getting the opportunity to sample their unreleased Banyuls Grenache. Why is it that wine gone bad can taste so good? Mick Unti also poured a wine they will be bottling in December -- I had too many glasses at that point to remember they were calling it. It will be Unti's first $45 wine, but they are just that proud of it.

We were in the 'fun' corner on the patio. Mick Unti came over to eat a course with our three tables; he made a graceful exit after several conversation topics may have turned him various shades of scarlet.

Back

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No time for full posts, but some random bits:

  • In a correction to my previous Japan trip log, I'd like to proudly state that I now have a DS Lite. ota, m, and I waited in line at the Ikebukuro Toys R' Us and were able to pick some up. I promptly bought a copy of old-school Dr. Mario, which doesn't use the capabilities of DS Lite in the least, but I'm looking forward to trying some other games out. I did pick up a copy of the 'America' travel assitant, which I will play around with to see if it is good enough for reverse English->Japanese usage.
  • Jangara Ramen in Akihabara/Omotesando makes me sad to eat ramen in the US again.
  • All-you-can-eat food in Japan is awesome. We had all-you-can-eat dessert at Sweets Paradise in Ginza for ~$13 and all-you-can-eat shabu shabu at Mo Mo Paradise in Shinjuku for ~$15. I suggest that you visit these places first when visiting Japan, as your stomach will start to shrink from the smaller Japanese food portions the longer you're there. I think I lost weight despite the constant consumption of highly sugared vending machine drinks.
  • I think I should have been using Japanese soap and shampoo my whole life. It's possible that it's the California desert climate, but my half-Japanese skin didn't feel the least bit itchy like it does with US products.
  • Is Karl Rove indicted, or no? I'm confused.
  • Lost is finally going somewhere, just in time for the season finale this week. It sure does make me think that the entire first half of the season was a waste.
  • TiVo let me down on recording the Giro di Italia. Bad TiVo!

Curry variations

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If you're preparing Japanese curry, my aunts recommend the following variations: * grate an entire apple into the mix * toss in a bit of coffee grounds * mix multiple brands of curry * add in worchestire sauce * add in soy sauce

I'll have to experiment to figure out which variations I like best.

Dazaifu Station-17 Dazaifu Station-21 Dazaifu Station-06

On my first full day in Japan my aunts took me to Dazaifu Station in Fukuoka. Dazaifu Station is home to Dazaifu Tenmangu, a Shinto shrine for Tenjin, as well as Komyozenji, a Buddhist temple with a Zen garden in back. Both are tourist attractions, i.e. they are not places for quiet contemplation, but they are very beautiful tourist attractions. In between our visit to the shrine and the temple we had lunch at Ume no Hana, a restaurant that specializes in tofu. Our lunch consisted of about fifteen courses, most of which I have photos of. Part of your meal price is the plates you choose to eat on, so thanks goes to my aunt for the nice plates you see pictured. I can't read our menu so I don't have proper names for most of the courses.

It was a little paranoia-inducing to see a photo of a bridge you just crossed at Dazaifu Tenmangu in a national newspaper the next day, but as it turns out the crown prince was in town.

All thirty photos from Dazazifu Station

Dazaifu Station-10 Dazaifu Station-05Dazaifu Station-08 Dazaifu Station-02 Dazaifu Station-16 Dazaifu Station-18 Dazaifu Station-13 Dazaifu Station-22 Dazaifu Station-28 Dazaifu Station-29 Dazaifu Station-27 Dazaifu Station-24

Quick post from Japan

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Japan goes well and I've found some US Internet here on a military base nearby. My mom is off buying pizza for my aunt and Popeye's Chicken for me, so I have a bit of time.

I'm having a great time with my family. My aunts have been teaching me more proper green tea preparation as well as curry-cooking technique. In between has been several visits to 100 yen shops as well as a bus tour of Nagasaki.

The layout of Sasebo is reminiscent of a European town with twisty, tiny roads in the center, though most of the buildings here are less than 50 years old. The outer perimeter of the city appears to be a fortress conglomerate of giant pachinko parlors. The inside of those parlors sound like a waterfall, but substitute little metal balls for water and add a bunch of Vegas blinging noises. Five minutes was enough to make my ears ring.

The culture here has plenty of American influence -- the city's most famous food export is the Sasebo Burger and they've added a Starbucks and Seattle's Best Coffee since I last visited. I'm still not used to seeing teenagers dressed like rappers and grunge rockers.

I just purchased some t-shirts that I wanted to share with you:

Solution
Fraud Tradition
Mount Sedge the Cobalt Blue Beard
Explicate
disunion verbal

Usally Stomack as crunches are as appealing to you as pop quizzes
But not anymore.
This year you would-be couch potatoes are posed to become
very buff spuds.

As wonderful as these t-shirts are, I think the strangest thing is seeing how popular marijuana leaf (hemp) air fresheners are. It was a bit weird seeing them for sale in a kids store next to Minnie Mouse, but even weirder was seeing a Buddhist monk driving around with a marijuana leaf logo hanging from his rearview mirror.

That's all for now.

Food thoughts

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Wandering the Yahoo! cafeteria, it seems to be a less cool Google cafeteria. The Y! cafeteria has some nice things, but you get them for free at Google.

They were out of coffee.

Profile of the One Eater

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ASIAN POP: Superchomp / Korean-born Sonya Thomas is the No. 1 ranked female competitive eater in the USA.

There is an century-old prophecy within the competitive-eating community, dismissed by most, that foretells the rise of the One Eater, a woman who will electrify America's gurgitators and lead them to international victory once again. Like Joan of Arc before her, this eater will be slender of stature but mighty in strength. In recent months, the prophecy has been mentioned more and more frequently as the eaters have watched Sonya Thomas excel in nearly every contest she enters.

Neuro fuzzy

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Plenty of news to report, which I may get to tomorrow, but for now, enjoy the latest and greatest in AI technology, the super "neuro fuzzy" rice cooker:

01-11-05.neurofuzzy-1-1.jpg

Chocolate tasting

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chocolateJed organized a group to go chocolate tasting at a class at Draeger's in San Mateo. It was run by Jason Garoutte, who had given a talk at PARC.

I have to say that chocolate tasting is a lot of fun. It's a lot like a wine tasting, and you can even supplement the tasting with wine, bread, and cheese (the latter being necessary for cleansing the palette). Prior to this tasting, I knew nothing about chocolate. I still know very little, but at the very least I can now start appreciating some of the more discerning qualities of chocolate.

Warning: chocolate tasting can be expensive to your budget. After we were given a sample of Hershey's to compare with the nicer chocolates, I'm not sure I can taste Hershey's chocolate ever again. Its hard to explain how foul it tastes with the memory of good chocolate still fresh on the mind.

If you want the experience of a chocolate tasting on your own and you live in the Bay Area, you can pick up one of Garoutte's tasting kits at Draeger's.

For the istuffers

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bp and meta had a project where they were going to build a button next to your computer that you could press that would order a pizza for your (credit for the idea goes to jeffb). I believe one of the more difficult chains in the process was actually ordering pizza. This might help, though it will only get you Dominoes:
Pizza Party - Command Line Pizza ordering program
(via kottke)

Vinegar is surprisingly Post-Impressionist...

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Photos: Through the Looking Glass - Tea

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Book: Fast Food Nation

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(originally posted January 27, 2004)
In my post on Jennifer Government, I started off by saying "I seem to have a habit when I read books of reading two books in a row that are very similar in their themes." Well, I guess I can revise that to three books in a row in this case, and it's not a pleasant similarity.

I'm only two chapters into the book, but I stumbled upon an unpleasantness that makes Barry's Jennifer Government vision for the future seem all too real. In Barry's book, all schools are run by corporations like McDonald's or Pepsi, and the syllabus is entirely centered around preaching the values that the sponsor has to offer. Sounds pretty far-fetched, at least several orders of magnitude beyond the soda machine that my high school had. How wrong I was about the current state of the US educational system.

Fast Food Nation offers these examples of corporations using high school as advertising banners:
- A student was suspended for wearing a Pepsi shirt during "Coke in Education Day" at the school
- An agreement was made to open a Pepsi GeneratioNext Resource Center at an elementary school in Derby, Kansas
- Thousands of schools use corporated-sponsored teaching texts. Proctor & Gamble's Decision Earth teaches that clear cutting is good for the environment. Exxon's teaching materials inform kids that fossil fuels have caused few environmental problems and that alternate fuel sources are too expensive. The American Coal Foundation suggests that carbon dioxide might actually help, rather than hurt the planet.
- Fast food chains advertise on Channel One, which is broadcasted to eight million students daily.

Who knows what other sadly depressing insights this book will have in store for me...

Update: further along in the book now. Kenny with the herniated back sounds an awful lot like Boxer from Animal Farm, except for the part about the glue.

Update 2/14/04: done now. Learned a lot more disgusting facts. I wrote a brief review of the book in the full entry.

Update 2/14/04: don't know if this is real, but this seems like a appropriate reading to accompany Fast Food Nation. According to the site, which is claimed to be run by the guy who tested the American mad cow, the USDA has effectively stopped testing for Mad Cow in order to prevent the appearance of an epidemic. Just as disturbing is the assertion, which also appears in this MSNBC story, that the cow was not a 'downer' cow. This is important, as it is policy only to test downer cows for mad cow disease. The cow in question happened to arrive with a bunch of other downer cows, and the handler was impatient and killed it with the rest of the downers.

Oh my aching hands

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Maybe this is responsible for my RSI. I hate my asian half
CNN.com - Study: Chopsticks may cause arthritis - Oct. 25, 2003