Results tagged “race” from kwc blog

Comics and cartoons are educational

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... especially those from WWII: Milton Caniff's How to Spot a Jap

Some quotes:

The Chinese has a smooth face .. the Jap runs to hair. Look at theirprofiles ant teeth. C usually has evenly set choppers -- J has buck teeth ... the Chinese smiles easily -- the Jap usually expects to be shot .. and is very unhappy about the wholething ... especially if he is an officer!

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If you just slap a Jap's clothing to locate concealed weapons you may lose a prisoner -- and your life ... don't unscrew fountain pens or tinker with any object that could contain acid or an explosive. Watch out for sleeve guns and other comic strip gadgets ... The Japs are experts at such stuff ...

See also: Bugs Bunny Nips the Nips, and Tokio Jokio via BoingBoing

Link roundup

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My dorky quote for the day

I had two teachers for algorithms class. One spoke as if conversation were a non-returning recursive function

I'm clearing out the Firefox tabs. BoingBoing appears to have beaten me to posting some of these, oh well

Raspberry retiring

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William Raspberry is retiring, which saddens me, as I wouldn't hesitate to name him as my favorite columnist. I first read his columns in journalism class and have been hooked ever since. His most recent column, Our Civil Disagreement, summarizes many of the reasons why I enjoy his work. Few columnists present a viewpoint that is open to disagreement. This is a very different notion from inviting disagreement, which seems to be the fashion of current news shows.

His second-most-recent column, Where to Now?, references to Oldenburg's "Third Places" in a way that makes me appreciate having Dana Street Roasting Company around the corner.

One helpful friend to whom I put the dilemma pointed me to Ray Oldenburg's 16-year-old book, "The Great Good Place," wherein he laments the loss of what he calls "third places" in American life. The first place, of course, is home; the second is work. Third places, in Oldenburg's taxonomy, are those informal gathering spots where one finds not just escape but camaraderie, conversation, friendly argument and pleasant conversation with regulars.

I rarely make it New Years resolutions, but for 2006 I'll declare one to be that, as I engage in conversations in my own third places, I be open to disagreement. You're free to test me next time you run into me at Dana Street.

Book: Invisible Man

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Some quotes in the extended (not as many as I should have). I turned up a Salon article on "Invisible Man" at 50, which some may find as an interesting companion to the book.

Connections

Having just finished Midnight's Children, White Teeth, and Invisible Man, it's only natural I guess that my brain who try to connect the three together. The connections between White Teeth and *Midnight's Children" are the most obvious, given that Zadie Smith does not try to hide the influence of Salman Rushdie on her work.

There were passages that Smith had written about Millat from White Teeth that immediatelly reminded me of Ellison's descriptions of Rinehart (and to a lesser extent, the ever-shifting Saleem in Midnight's Children), though Millat tries to encompass all of his identities at once, and together these identities represents a crisis of identity, versus Rinehart, for whom identity is like a hat, each representing a new possibility that can be worn. Zadie Smith sees the shifting of identity as a sign of illness (missing twin, loss of culture, invisibility to father Samad) causing "an ever-present anger and hurt."

Invisible Man, p. 498

Can it be, I thought, can it actually be? And I knew that it was. I had heard of it before but I'd never come so close. Still, could he be all of them: Rine the runner and Rine the gambler and Rine the briber and Rine the lover and Rinehart the Reverend? Could he himself be both rind and heart? What is real anyway? But how could I doubt it? He was a broad man, a man of parts who got around. Rinehart the rounder. It was true as I was true. His world was possibility and he knew it. He was years ahead of me and I was a fool. I must have been crazy and blind. The world in which we lived was without boundaries.

White Teeth, p. 225

And that's how it was for Millat. He was so big in Cricklewood, in Willesden, n West Hampsteada, the summer of 1990, that nothing he did later in his life could top it. From his first Raggastani crowd, he had expanded and developed tribes throughout the schoool, throughout North London. He was simply too big to remain the object of Irie's affection, leader of the Raggastanis, or the son of Samad and Alsana Iqbal. He had to please all of the people all of the time. To the Cockney wideboys in the white jeans and the coolored shirts he was the joker, the risktaker, respected lady-killer. To the black kids he was fellow weed-smoker and valued customer. To the Asian kids, hero and spokesman. Social chameleon. And underneath it all, there remained an ever-present anger and hurt, the feeling of belonging nowhere that comes to people who belong everywhere.

I also found contrast between Invisible Man and Midnight's Children: the former which uses an unnamed protagonist who stumbles into new identities throughout, versus the many-named Saleem of Midnight's Children, who achieves both godly and base distinction through his naming.