Results tagged “writable web” from kwc blog

PageOfText:Wiki as Twitter:Blogging

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Gordon pointed me over to his Page of Text site this morning. It's kinda like Twitter, but for Wikis instead. You get a page, there's no real markup (unless you really dig for it), and that's about it . As someone who finds the entry cost and commitment of Wikis to be too steep, this is perfect for me. I remarked to him over coffee that just about ever piece of text I interact with is either (a) on a Web server or (b) in CVS/SVN. One of the only exceptions to this is the good 'ole 'scratch.txt' file that I keep on each computer that captures the isolated bits of text that have no proper home -- some todos, the occasional Unix to command, some URLs, etc...

This morning my Web server was out so I went ahead and composed an upcoming entry in my Page of Text. In fact, I'll finish composing this entry in Page of Text and you can play around with it here.

What are these blue spots?

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I was playing around with Wikimapia, which seems to be a fun site because people have annotated a Google Map so that you can find out various things like apartment complex names, bike path entrances, sites of former dumps, etc... One of the best features of the site is that you can easily select a region of the map to post to your blog, like I did above.

The area above is the entrace to the Dish loop off of Junipero Serra -- anyone know what those blue spots are?

And speaking of maps: I hope to see the Old Maps group of Flickr grow.

Backpack: way cool, way too much $$$

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Update: (5/2/05) Backpack has upped it's limits since I originally wrote this entry. Free accounts now get 5 pages (up from 3) and the $5/month account get 20 pages (up from 15). They also increased the storage for the $5/month account from 25MB to 40MB. In the entry below I've indicated some of these changes, but it seems silly to have little "(update: )" or strike notations everywhere, especially when these changes don't really change the way I feel about their pricing. The most important limit to me is "20 pages." How useful would a Wiki that could only store 20 pages be? How useful would a blog with 20 entries be? The feature I like about Backpack is that it makes it easy to create content. Their pricing stands in opposition to these potential uses and only makes sense if they are targetting this at business users that can afford the extra $$$ for higher limits -- but why target business users when you already have Basecamp?

original entry follows...

I've been playing a bit more with Backpack -- it combines much of the free-flow composition of Wiki with the ease-of-use and power of structured data (e.g. todo lists). When they release it to the public it might become a very useful 'application' for me and my friends to plan events together, but...

...we're not going to be able to plan that many events with it because the free account only gives you 3 pages total (update: 5), and the non-free plans are way too friggin' expensive. And by 'way', I mean WAY.

As a pricing reference point, I would compare it to Flickr, which I use constantly and have a two-year Pro account for.

FlickrBackpack
$25/year$60/year*
2GB/month25MB total (now 50MB)
Unlimited photosets15 pages (now 20)

* This pricing is based on Backpack's basic account (cheapest non-free account).

It's just not even in the same ballpark. Even when Flickr cost $40/year (pre-Yahoo), it was still a bargain compared to Backpack.

The 15-page limit is especially egregious. I can begin to understand the 25MB cap on file and photo upload, but limiting me to having 15 pages that hardly take up any space and are the central feature of the service is just plain assinine. IMHO, $60/year is a terrible price to pay for 15 Web pages, even if they are super-snazzy and editable. I could delete an old page to make more room, but why force me to do that? With the advent of Gmail and Flickr I thought we had gotten past that whole notion of having to delete old information.

Got my backpack

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update 2 (5/3/05): I (still) like Backpack -- it's a well designed technology, with a diverse set of potential applications. However, I think their page limit is whack (i.e. it eliminates many of those potential uses by making them unaffordable). My extended gripe is here.


I got my Backpack account today and I'm pretty excited. I've been bastardizing 37signal's project management software, but Backpack should do away with that as it makes it easy to build pages with lists, links, notes, images, files, etc... that you can share with friends. All of it can be edited quickly and directly in the browser.

While I was at PARC I worked on Sparrow Web, which was a technology for making easily-writable Web pages, and I've been missing that technology ever since I left, so it's nice to have what appears to be a good, fast, free, easy-to-use writable Web page system.

I'll write more once I have a chance to really test drive it.

Update: here's our Fred Steak Planning Page that honeyfields and I put together. They're not opening Backpack up to the public until Tuesday, so until then I won't be able to give anyone the ability to edit the page, which makes the Fred Steak page rather pointless right now.